SUBMIT ABOUT FAQ
PEOPLE COMPANIES VENUES
LOGIN NEW USER PRODUCTIONS
REVIEWERS SIX DEGREES
A User-Driven Site for Theater in Atlanta, Georgia
Little Women
a Drama
CATEGORY : DRAMA
by Marisha Chamberlain

COMPANY : Main Street Theatre Tucker [WEBSITE]
VENUE : Tucker Recreation Center
ID# 5536

SHOWING : July 19, 2019 - July 28, 2019

[REVIEW THIS PRODUCTION]

PRODUCTION DESCRIPTION

For over 150 years, Little Women has captured the hearts of young ladies making the complicated transition from girl to woman. Our non-traditional, diverse production will delve into the universal struggles that every woman in every age must face and conquer. Love, jealousy, disappointment and death know no decade or century. The typical hoop skirts, corsets and lace will have to be used another time. Join us as we tell this ageless story in a timeless way


CAST & CREW LIST
Director Merle Halliday Westbrook
Marmee Veronica Burman
Jo Erin Eben
Father Evan Greene
Hannah Carrie Harris
Mr. Brooke Matt Hiltman
Old Mr. Laurence Wayne Kelley
Laurie Keegan McDaniel
Beth Katie Mogilski
Meg Carly Sharec
Aunt March Pat Smith
Amy Mia Trocchi
Click to Submit Cast & Crew Info for this production
REVIEWS

[REVIEW THIS PRODUCTION]

Swimmin’ in Women
by playgoer
Wednesday, August 21, 2019
3.0
Louisa May Alcott’s "Little Women" takes place during and after the Civil War. Main Street Theatre has decided to re-jigger the timeline to something more modern. When is not clear. Carrie Harris’ costumes suggest the 1940s, while some of Lisa Temples’ props suggest more recent times. John Williams’ set design resembles the 19th century in its overall look, although the stairway platforms stage right that lead up to the garret have a modernist feel. The racial diversity of the cast is meant to invoke the modern day, but the gothic melodramas that Jo writes harken back clearly to Louisa May Alcott’s day. It all gives a bit of the feel that the production decided to make do with whatever was at hand.

The set contains a sofa center, a piano down left, a dining table up left, and a fireplace far left. Stage right is taken up by the stairs and garret, with a birdhouse down right. There’s a wall unit upstage. A semi-circular addition to the front center of the stage adds a little playing space, but the blocking by director Merle Halliday Westbrook often seems cramped. Furniture is rearranged now and again, but the action seems to take place primarily in the March household.

The finest technical element in the show is Preston Cross’ lighting design. The upstage wall of the set is fabric that basks in the glow of different colors during scene changes. This adds immeasurable visual interest to the production. During scenes, the illumination of the fabric fades into the background, just as it should.

Ms. Westbrook has ensured that her actors speak clearly and distinctly. Charlie Wasmer’s sound design amplifies the voices so that every word is clear. A few of the actors have speech patterns that have the stilted rhythm of someone concentrating more on projection than on naturalism, but speech is consistently fluid. Ms. Westbrook has obviously drilled her troupe so that they have an excellent command of their lines.

Erin Eben is full of vocal and physical energy as Jo, and Keegan McDaniel matches her energy as Laurie. Fine performances come from Matt Hiltman and Evan Greene in the small roles respectively of Brooke and Father. Pat Smith also makes a strong impression as Aunt March, and Carrie Harris has a natural ease onstage as Hannah. The four sisters at the center of the story are quite distinct in character and demeanor, letting the story of them and their mother shine through.

The adaptation by Marisha Chamberlain does not give us all of Alcott’s "Little Women." The play starts as the book does, on a Christmas where Father is away at war. It ends on another Christmas, when Father has returned home. The feminism of protagonist Jo is reiterated again and again, and the resolution of the play seems to reinforce this as the play’s message. It’s perhaps a little thin as an adaptation, but plays relatively well and does not overstay its welcome.
[POST A COMMENT REGARDING THIS REVIEW]


[REVIEW THIS PRODUCTION]

CLOSING SOON
Baby
by Sybille Pearson (book), David Shire (music), Richard Maltby, Jr. (lyrics)
Act 3 Productions
Swell Party
by Topher Payne
The Process Theatre Company
NOW PLAYING
Almost, Maine
by John Cariani
Centerstage North Theatre
Baby
by Sybille Pearson (book), David Shire (music), Richard Maltby, Jr. (lyrics)
Act 3 Productions
Daddy Long Legs
by John Caird (book) and Paul Gordon (songs)
The Legacy Theatre
Downstairs
by Theresa Rebeck
Actor's Express
Midnight at the Masquerade
by The Murder Mystery Company
The Murder Mystery Company in Atlanta
Swell Party
by Topher Payne
The Process Theatre Company

©2012 TheaterReview.com. All rights reserved.