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REVIEWERS SIX DEGREES
A User-Driven Site for Theater in Atlanta, Georgia
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Companies Reviewed#
Theatre Decatur1
Neighborhood Playhouse1
Onstage Atlanta, Inc.1
Off The Cob Comedy Improv1
Theatre Arts Guild1
Average Rating Given : 3.80000
Reviews in Last 6 months :
REVIEWS

WORKING - A Musical, by Studs Terkel, Stephen Schwartz, Nina Faso
"Working" works sometimes and sometimes not
Tuesday, October 31, 2006
3.0
Last Friday I attended the opening of this show that I saw a few years back in Arizona. The first time I saw it, I was greatly impressed. Howe can you go wrong with songs by several well known composers including James Taylor and Stephen Schwartz? This production was hit and miss.

The best part of the show for me was Sally Robertson who played several roles including a school teacher and a housewife. She brought a stirring reality to her characters and really helped us to see them as more than generic stereo types. Each character was different and fresh to watch. Another actor I enjoyed was Rob Hardie as parking lot guy Al. He seemed to have fun playing this character. I enjoyed his jazz style number and his group of female back ups. He also played a trucker in one scene. It was a nice number, but that's all. His portrayal of a fireman almost brought me to tears, though the language was harsh. He pulled it off well. Kristie Krabe did a really nice job as a waitress and seemed to sparkle as she sang. Her "Millwork" number was nice (staged well too)but the girl delivering the monologue seemed flat and emotionless. This robbed Krabe of what could have been a powerful number. Jeffrey David Gibb has a lovely voice and great musical theatre energy. Not sure if I completely bought him as the Construction worker, but this was due to age. Massa Hoff did a very nice turn as a Maid frustrated in her work and hoping for a better life for her daughter.

Where the show falls flat is the lack of depth or energy from most of the ensemble. They seemed bored, and the opening number seemed lackluster at best.
The spanish number was disasterous. I speak spanish and could barely make out what theyw ere trying to sing. The male lead was great, but the ensemble seemed to be muttering. The finale was just odd. Odd because again, the cast seemed to be muttering. The set was very well done, though I didn't get why it was on a construction site when so many other vocations are represented. The overall staging was hit and miss. Some numbers worked really well, while others made no sense at all.

When the show works it really works. But the low energy and miscast moments just don't. Stll, it does have my vote as a show worth seeing.

Comedy Improv Nights, by
A great night for the money
Friday, August 4, 2006
4.0
I didn't know what to expect walking into the small theatre. I was very surprised by how in sync these folks were as a group. Feeding off each other, and creating something out of nothing. Much kudos to this group. They might want to shorten some bits, or move them to conclusion quiker. Otherwie-great fun!

Victor/Victoria, by Blake Edwards, Henry Mancini, Leslie Bricusse, Frank Wildhorn
Victor/Victoria Less than average
Friday, August 4, 2006
2.0
I forgot to review this when it was in the theater. I apologize for my tardiness. There were several stand out performances. The Highlights were Kathleen McCook and cott Ebert. The show overall, does not seem to translate very well from Stage to screen. I don't think that this is the director's (Barry West) fault. Broadway has gotten much more adept at adapting movies into shows in recent years. Victor/Victoria was put on Broadway before this became the popular thing to do.
This show just does not move. After seeing shows at Onstage like Urinetown, Songs For A New World and K2, This show did not live up to the energy of these other landmark shows. One other note: The costumes were not flattering at all to the performers. Sorry Onstage, you can't win them all.

Dracula: The Musical?, by Rick Abbot
DRACULA HITS THE MARK!
Saturday, February 4, 2006
5.0
Okay, I admit that I have been discouraged. After attending local theaters, seeing a few brilliant performances, and several bad ones, I had come to the conclusion that I would not see a show that had consistently good direction and a consistently good cast. This all changed last weekend with Dracula: The Musical. It had pacing, laughs, character interaction and everything you want to see when out at the theatre. Letís start with the mood as you walk into the theater and see the creative set design (Harley Ghould). A spooky, yet elegant castle with fireplace ablaze. The show is not your traditional Dracula from that point on. It is a spoof. A very well written spoof performed by a group of gifted actors, all with a true sense of comedy. We have the brass maid (Karen Whitaker) who opens the show and is a closet drinker. She spouts out her lines with charisma that is not lost by the audience. You have Dr & Mrs. Seward (Charlie Bradshaw & Renee Najour Payne) Who act like they have been married for ever, and toss off droll little snippets, with her playing dumb to a fault. Mina, their daughter (Amanda Leigh Pickard) has a pretty voice and a vast range of facial expressions and reactions that make her a delight to watch. There is the houseguest (that has no real apparent reason for being there played by Patty Mosley. She performs one of the most memorable vocal numbers in the show in a sexy white night gown with the other women (worth the price of admission). Stealing the show are is of course Dracula (Brad Bergeron, an Indiana Jones like Van Helsing (Mathew Carter) and a believably certifiable Boris Renfield (Ken McMillian). These characters comic reactions, over the top acting and pure energy are contagious to the other cast members. These men have made each character different and unique as to keep the audience interested at all times.
The director (Jeffery Brown) did an amazing job with stage pictures and blocking. His pacing is some of the best I have seen. My only complaint is that sometimes the lines went by so fast, without any dramatic pause, that we lost the joke. Double takes and reactions are just as important in this wacky kind of (Airplane/ Mel Brooks style) humor, as pacing and timing. Characters should have been given more time to place reactions. The script by Rick Abott is wickedly funny, but the songs (save maybe two) are not memorable. The lighting design was flawless (Tom Gillespie) and the costumes were some of the nicest I have seen. I think perhaps the use of wigs was a bit over done, but that is just personal taste. My hats off to the costumer ( Clint Horne) for his creativity.

Very rarely do I enjoy local theatre as much as I did that night. I will definitely be back to this theater again. Vampires wouldn't keep me away.

Dracula: The Musical?, by Rick Abbot
Dracula hits the mark.
Saturday, February 4, 2006
5.0
Okay, I admit that I have been discouraged. After attending local theaters, seeing a few brilliant performances, and several bad ones, I had come to the conclusion that I would not see a show that had consistently good direction and a consistently good cast. This all changed last weekend with Dracula: The Musical. It had pacing, laughs, character interaction and everything you want to see when out at the theatre. Letís start with the mood as you walk into the theater and see the creative set design (Harley Ghould). A spooky, yet elegant castle with fireplace ablaze. The show is not your traditional Dracula from that point on. It is a spoof. A very well written spoof performed by a group of gifted actors, all with a true sense of comedy. We have the brass maid (Karen Whitaker) who opens the show and is a closet drinker. She spouts out her lines with charisma that is not lost by the audience. You have Dr & Mrs. Seward (Charlie Bradshaw & Renee Najour Payne) Who act like they have been married for ever, and toss off droll little snippets, with her playing dumb to a fault. Mina, their daughter (Amanda Leigh Pickard) has a pretty voice and a vast range of facial expressions and reactions that make her a delight to watch. There is the houseguest (that has no real apparent reason for being there played by Patty Mosley. She performs one of the most memorable vocal numbers in the show in a sexy white night gown with the other women (worth the price of admission). Stealing the show are is of course Dracula (Brad Bergeron, an Indiana Jones like Van Helsing (Mathew Carter) and a believably certifiable Boris Renfield (Ken McMillian). These characters comic reactions, over the top acting and pure energy are contagious to the other cast members. These men have made each character different and unique as to keep the audience interested at all times.
The director (Jeffery Brown) did an amazing job with stage pictures and blocking. His pacing is some of the best I have seen. My only complaint is that sometimes the lines went by so fast, without any dramatic pause, that we lost the joke. Double takes and reactions are just as important in this wacky kind of (Airplane/ Mel Brooks style) humor, as pacing and timing. Characters should have been given more time to place reactions. The script by Rick Abott is wickedly funny, but the songs (save maybe two) are not memorable. The lighting design was flawless (Tom Gillespie) and the costumes were some of the nicest I have seen. I think perhaps the use of wigs was a bit over done, but that is just personal taste. My hats off to the costumer ( Clint Horne) for his creativity.

Very rarely do I enjoy local theatre as much as I did that night. I will definitely be back to this theater again. Vampires wouldn't keep me away.

OPENING SOON
The Summer of Our Discontent
by various
Onion Man Productions
CLOSING SOON
Little Shop of Horrors
by Howard Ashman (words) & Alan Menken (music)
Actor's Express
NOW PLAYING
Ada and the Memory Engine
by Lauren Gunderson
Essential Theatre
Little Shop of Horrors
by Howard Ashman (words) & Alan Menken (music)
Actor's Express
The Spy Who Murdered Me
by Kevin Gillese
Agathas: A Taste of Mystery
The Summer of Our Discontent
by various
Onion Man Productions
Uprooting
by Betty Chaney
Academy Theatre

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