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Dracula

a Drama
CATEGORY : DRAMA
by Steven Dietz

COMPANY : Aurora Theatre [WEBSITE]
VENUE : Aurora Theatre [WEBSITE]
ID# 3172

SHOWING : October 09, 2008 - November 02, 2008

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PRODUCTION DESCRIPTION

It's Dracula.... you know how it goes....


CAST & CREW LIST
Cast Walter Magnuson
Click to Submit Cast & Crew Info for this production
REVIEWS

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The Pulse of Horror
by Dedalus
Tuesday, November 4, 2008
3.5
Everybody’s favorite pain-in-neck is back, as the Aurora Theatre mounts a moody and eerily erotic “Dracula,” just in time for the autumn chill-the-bones season. This is the Steven Dietz 1996 adaptation that sticks a bit closer to the original Bram Stoker than does the Hamilton Deane version (revived on Broadway in 1977 with Frank Langella and sets by Edward Gorey). Since the original Stoker novel is done in an epistolary style (told in letters and telegrams), let us imagine my alter-ego Dedalus in a similar correspondence:

=============================================================================

To: Stephen Dedalus
Marietta, GA

Mr. Dedalus:

I have in my possession certain tickets to a theatrical presentation of “Dracula” that I feel honor-bound to forward to your attention. It is my belief that they were intended for you, as your name and address appear on them. I hope they find their way to you in time.

Sincerely,
Millicent Bloom
Lawrenceville, GA

=============================================================================

Ms. Bloom:

Thank you so much for the tickets. I am enclosing with this letter a similar ticket which seems to bear your name. I notice it is for an earlier performance. Please feel free to send me your reactions, so I can go into this presentation with a sense of expectation.

Thank you, again, and I hope you enjoy the play.

Sincerely,
Stephen

=============================================================================

Stephen:

I hope I am not presumptuous in calling you so. I am usually not this forward. You no doubt noticed mine was a single ticket, and I will, in fact, be attending the performance alone. I have no hopes to be more than an occasional correspondent (I do so enjoy writing letters), as your tickets were a set of two. May I continue to write without causing distress to your domestic situation? Per your invitation, I will be most pleased to send you my reaction to the play. I have read your work, and, though I do not count myself a fan, I do have respect for the size of your vocabulary.

Sincerely,
Millie

=============================================================================

Babboo:

Did you see this? Is this woman for real? Why don’t you write her back?

J’T’Aime!
Gasboy

=============================================================================

Ms. Bloom:

It is my sincere belief that your continued correspondence with my husband will in no way cause distress to our domestic situation. Feel free to continue to write, knowing that what he reads will also be read by myself. I too miss the art of letter writing, and am pleased to see you are a practitioner.

Cordially,
Mrs. B.J. Dedalus

=============================================================================

Stephen:

It was such a joy to hear back from your wife. It sounds as if you are indeed a very happy, very secure couple. I saw “Dracula” last night, and would love to discuss it with you. Unlike you, however, I dare not entrust my sacred opinions to the printed page (and yes, to my mind, opinions are sacred, as they represent what is truly “of the soul”). May I be so bold as to invite you and your wife out to dinner following your matinee? I will wait in the lobby.

Ever yours,
Millie

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Gasboy – NO WAY! – Babboo

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Millie:

I’m afraid we will be unable to meet you following our viewing of “Dracula.” My wife has a prior commitment, and I must hie home as soon as possible to relieve the Babysitter.

However, we do appreciate your kind invitation.

Regretfully,
S. Dedalus

=============================================================================

Mr. Dedalus:

I regret you are taking such a formal approach to our correspondence. Your ill-considered opinions will have no bearing on my pursuit of Justice (and yes, that needs to be capitalized!).

You will be faced with a reckoning!

M. Bloom

=============================================================================

S – WTF? – B

=============================================================================

Millie:

I was very surprised to see you after my viewing of “Dracula,” and was even my surprised at the eloquence and clarity of your views. It was one of the more enjoyable post-theatre chats I’ve had in a long time. Of course, I still have more to say. (As you so delicately put it, when do I not?)

Like you, I found Mr. Kincaid’s Van Helsing a bit overblown and portentous. Yet, it was in synch with the spirit of the piece. Scriptwise, I disagree with you about the beginning and ending – using Renfield as a seeming storyteller is structurally questionable, as is the final nudge-nudge-wink-wink at the audience. However, everything in between was perfectly in tune with not only Mr. Stoker’s original novel, but with all the cultural baggage that has been attached to his work over the past century.

As you said, my shout-out to Mr. Quay’s “As You Like It” walk-on last summer was indicative that he is a local talent on the emergent. His Dracula was creepy, scary, and, (I presume to female eyes) quite arousing (you seemed to think so, anyway). I wasn’t as you by irritated by Ms. Kohout’s nasal-squeak delivery as Lucy, and, unlike you, I was sad for her fate. Likewise, I found Ms. Mantella’s Mina more compelling than you did, and was impressed by how she handled the climactic pull-the-wool-over-our-eyes moment. We are in definite agreement, though, that Mr. Martin’s Harker and Mr. Brendle’s Seward were bland, but functional. If these are the best choices available to Victorian women, no wonder so many were attracted to the myth of vampirism (and I will resist the urge to insert an “LOL” or a smileycon at this point).

The true attraction of this play though, for me and for you, has to be the mood, the design, the set and lights and sound that sucked us into this world and creeped us out with a well-conceived collusion of horror and eroticism. The stars of this production are, as you said, director Joe Gfaller and Designers Rob Dillard and Chris Bartelski.

Although your last letter puzzled both my wife and myself, I was ever so pleased to finally make your acquaintance, and to talk at length with you.

As you suggested, I will not be sharing this letter with Mrs. Dedalus, though I will be sharing our future correspondence.

Best Wishes,
Stephen

=============================================================================

My Dearest Steve:

I was dreadfully sorry to hear about your dear wife’s accident. I’m sure this must be a terrible time for you and your sweet daughter.

If there is anything I can do to help with the memorial service, please let me know.

I will be there for you in your time of need.

Love Forever,
Millie-boo

=============================================================================

-- Brad Rudy (BKRudy@aol.com)



[POST A COMMENT REGARDING THIS REVIEW]
..... by Heightyy5
...... What the hell was that?
A Punishment by Dedalus
What it is is an experiment in style I'm inflicting on all you poor readers. Sometimes, I try to capture the essence of a play by going to stylistic excess, writing in the "voice" of the author, or playing fast and loose with, um, plagiarism.

In this case, since the original Bram Stoker novel is told in letters and such, I thought it would be fun to write the review in the same style.

Besides, how often does a writer get to bump off his spouse and get away with it? :-)

(Sorry, Dear) ...

Thanks for coming on board!

-- Brad


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