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One Man, Two Guvnors

a Comedy
CATEGORY : COMEDY
by Richard Bean

COMPANY : Georgia Shakespeare [WEBSITE]
VENUE : Oglethorpe University-Lupton Hall Auditorium [WEBSITE]
ID# 4610

SHOWING : July 09, 2014 - July 27, 2014

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PRODUCTION DESCRIPTION

This British adaptation of Goldoni’s famous Commedia play, "Servant of Two Masters," is a laugh-out-loud mix of satire, song, slapstick comedy, and biting one-liners. 1740s Italy has been replaced with 1960s Brighton, England. Fired from his skiffle band, Francis Henshall becomes separately employed by two men - Roscoe Crabbe and a local gangster Stanley Stubbers. But Roscoe is really Rachel, posing as her own dead brother - who’s been killed by her boyfriend, who is none other than Stanley Stubbers. Francis spots the chance of an extra meal ticket-but to prevent discovery, he must keep his two guvnors apart. Simple, right?


CAST & CREW LIST
Director Drew Fracher
Pauline Clench Molly Coyne
Charlie Clench Allan Edwards
Alfie Richard Garner
Lloyd Boateng Neal A Ghant
Rachel Crabbe Ann Marie Gideon
Ensemble Devon Hales
Gareth Chris Kayser
Stanley Stubbers Joe Knezevich
Harry Dangle Brian Kurlander
Francis Henshall Aaron Muoz
Dolly Courtney Patterson
Ensemble Avery Sharpe
Alan Dangle Justin Walker
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REVIEWS

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Loads of Silly Fun
by playgoer
Sunday, July 27, 2014
4.5
"One Man, Two Guvnors" is based on a Carlo Goldoni comedy, updated to 1963 England, but with tongue-in-cheek references to the future that is now. It uses the conventions of commedia dell’arte, throwing in lots of audience interaction, at least some of which is scripted in (but acted as if it isn’t). The plot is silly nonsense, in which Aaron Muñoz’s character hires himself out as an assistant to two criminal characters with convoluted interrelationships. It really doesn’t make any sense in the modern world, and comes across as would a Shakespeare comedy set in a time period other than Elizabethan England.

Kat Conley’s scenic design uses kitschy, shiny curtains to hide the many scene changes. Rock band The Head plays music during the scene changes, extending them and lengthening the overall show. I’d say that they play songs, since singing is involved, but it almost all sounded like nonsense syllables to me. No sound designer is credited for the show, and sound is somewhat of a weak spot.

Christine Turbitt’s costume design sets the 1963 time period. Mike Post attractively lights the numerous sets, and this summer’s interns move furniture with kinetic choreography. Other than the overly long scene changes, it moves along nicely.

Director Drew Fracher has thrown the book of physical comedy into his blocking. Since he has such a skilled set of actors in all the roles, it works remarkably well. It’s all highly honed and professional, and loads of silly fun. Will it last in my memory? Probably not. Was it fun while I sat in my seat in the audience? Definitely. [POST A COMMENT REGARDING THIS REVIEW]


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