SUBMIT ABOUT FAQ
PEOPLE COMPANIES VENUES
LOGIN NEW USER PRODUCTIONS
REVIEWERS SIX DEGREES
A User-Driven Site for Theater in Atlanta, Georgia
Anton Acts Out

a Short Play Festival
CATEGORY : COMEDY DRAMA MUSICAL
by Various Writers

COMPANY : Synchronicity Performance Group [WEBSITE]
VENUE : 7 Stages [WEBSITE]
ID# 599

SHOWING : November 15, 2002 - December 07, 2002

[REVIEW THIS PRODUCTION]

PRODUCTION DESCRIPTION

A love story between a mother and daughter. A girl faces the end of innocence. Chekhov skewered on the comedian’s pen. An eclectic collage of plays, dance, and spoken word filled with surprising depth and humor.


CAST & CREW LIST
Producer/Choreographer Hope Mirlis
Director Sandra Benton
Director Heidi Howard
Director/Producer Michele Pearce
Director Karen Robinson
Director Clint Thornton
Set Designer Rochelle Barker
Lighting Designer Jessica Coale
Sound Designer Jennifer Drake
Stage Manager Casie M. Fisher
Technical Director Mack Headrick
Props Designer Tamara McElhannon
Costume Designer Nyrobi Moss
Stage Manager Mike Smith
Cast Annette Coleman
Cast Corrin Cramer
Cast Rachel Durston
Cast Amy Estlund
Cast Luis Hernandez
Cast Jessyca Holland
Cast Jennifer Levison
Cast Victoria Petrosky
Cast Alexandros Salazar
Cast Kathleen Wattis
Cast Anna Whitson
Cast Brit Whittle
Click to Submit Cast & Crew Info for this production
REVIEWS

[REVIEW THIS PRODUCTION]

The Writer Ponders (A Review in Four Acts)
by Dedalus
Monday, November 18, 2002
4.0
ACT I

(In the house of the writer. A cluttered writing room, beyond which a theatre library is visible. Mid-day, raining. The memorabilia in the library is gathering dust. The writer sits at his computer, not writing.)

The Writer
The artists of the Synchronicity Performance Group spent eighteen months thinking about “Three Sisters,” and creating short pieces based on their thoughts and feelings and reactions to their time spent with Chekhov. Eighteen hours have passed since I saw it.

(A Clock Strikes.)

Nineteen hours. Can nineteen hours of shallow pondering hope to do justice when writing of what took eighteen months to create?


ACT II

(The same. It is a day later. The dust has not been cleaned from the memorabilia. The writer sits, still frozen with indecision.)

The Writer
Can one ever go home? When I see shows on return visits to Pennsylvania, I usually think, “Were they this bad when I worked here?” I do not long to return.

Why am I not more depressed that I write more about plays I’ve seen than I do actually doing them? Or writing them? Do I turn my disappointment in not being cast into critical brickbats? Is revenge even possible in an artistic ethos?

(A Clock Strikes.)

What is on television tonight? Is it my turn to change the baby? Shall we eat in or out?


ACT III

(The bedroom of the writer and his wife. A large bed, surrounded by disordered piles of unread books. A toddler sleeps in an adjoining, but unseen nursery. The writer narrates his thoughts to his wife. The wife sleeps. A clock on the wall does not tick. Soft cello music may or may not be heard.)

The Writer
I loved the first two pieces and the last. I hated a few in the second act. The rest were good, but soon forgettable. Who am I, though, to judge? What did I like about the first? What did I hate about the rest? Is it significant that the ones I hate stick more in my mind than the ones I loved? Is this really true? After all, the adult sense of loss shown by Rachel Durston as young Olga in “The Music Box” was desperately moving. The ghosts of “Relativity” were funny and involving. The playwright of “A Wet Nurse Sings” was someone with whom I could easily empathize.

But it was “Losing Faith” which sticks in my mind most. After all, it was an “Anti-Three-Sisters.” It wasn’t about longing for past, but about embracing a future. It wasn’t about finding solace in the day-to-day details of life, but about abandoning them. And it seemed, at first, to be nothing but a build-up for the last line. My initial negative reaction seems to have gone to Moscow. After all, can there be a greater homage than deliberate opposition?

And in the dance piece, “Get thee … or How Do You Solve A Problem Like Irina?”, there seems to be too much joy in Irina on entering a cloistered, “non-useful” life. So why did I like the piece?

All the pieces (except one) were well-performed. Do I criticize the one that wasn’t? Do I even mention its name?

Why are the best pieces the first ones? It makes the rest of the evening anti-climatic. Or is it only my opinion that the first two were the best?

What do you think? Please talk to me!

(The toddler in the next room cries out from a bad dream. The wife does not wake. The clock does not tick.)


ACT IV

(The back of the writer’s house. Trunks of dying Georgia Pines frame a Deck, from which a hanging chair drifts in barely-felt breeze. Rain falls slowly. The writer sits in the chair, silently contemplating his navel.)

(The writer says nothing.)


-- Brad Rudy (BKRudy@aol.com) [POST A COMMENT REGARDING THIS REVIEW]


[REVIEW THIS PRODUCTION]

OPENING SOON
Ages of the Moon
by Sam Shepard
Onion Man Productions
CLOSING SOON
Nobody Loves You
by Itamar Moses (book & lyrics), Gaby Alter (music & lyrics)
Horizon Theatre Company
Pie in the Sky
by Lawrence Thelen
ART Station Theatre
The Daisy Princess
Onion Man Productions
Urinetown
by Mark Hollmann (book & lyrics) and Greg Kotis (music & lyrics)
Act 3 Productions
NOW PLAYING
A Few Good Men
by Aaron Sorkin
New Dawn Theater
August Summer Harvest 2016, The Lakeside Plays
by jpbeck
Onion Man Productions
God of Carnage
by Yasmina Reza
Pumphouse Players
Improv Monster
by Jackpie Theatre Workshop
Jackpie Theatre Workshop
Murder and Stranger Things
by John Babcock
Agathas: A Taste of Mystery
Nobody Loves You
by Itamar Moses (book & lyrics), Gaby Alter (music & lyrics)
Horizon Theatre Company
Pie in the Sky
by Lawrence Thelen
ART Station Theatre
Split Second
by Dennis McIntyre
Academy Theatre
The Daisy Princess
Onion Man Productions
Urinetown
by Mark Hollmann (book & lyrics) and Greg Kotis (music & lyrics)
Act 3 Productions

©2012 TheaterReview.com. All rights reserved.